Office for People With Developmental Disabilities

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Person-Centered Planning Regulation FAQ

09/28/18

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) provide informationfor the successful implementation of the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities’ (OPWDD) Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation, found at 14 NYCRR § 636, subpart 636-1 Person-Centered Planning, effective November 1, 2015. This regulation applies to all services and/or care coordination for individuals receiving services under the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver and to OPWDD HCBS waiver service providers.

No new requirements for compliance are contained in this document. Please refer to OPWDD’s website at www.opwdd.ny.gov for the applicable statutory, regulatory and administrative directives that pertain to the Person-Centered planning process.

What is Person-Centered Planning and a Person-Centered Service Plan?

Person-Centered Planning (PCP) is a process designed to ensure that everyone receiving services provided or authorized by OPWDD benefits from the most individualized supports and services possible. 

The PCP process should empower individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities to have an active voice in the development of their Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) and in shaping their own futures. It is an individualized approach to service planning, structured to focus on the unique values, strengths, preferences, capacities, interests, desired outcomes, and needs of the individual. PCP is a collaborative and recurrent process that must be utilized at the time an initial service plan is developed and again during all subsequent reviews of that service plan. PCSPs are expected to change and to adjust with the individual over time. Consequently, it is critical to revisit the PCSP as prescribed by OPWDD’s Administrative Directive Memorandum (ADM) #2010-03, in addition to whenever an individual finds it necessary to revise or amend their service plan.

The development and documentation of the PCSP is the primary and ongoing responsibility of the Service Coordinators/ Care Managers (SC/CM).[1] Habilitation staff who assist individuals in developing person-centered habilitation plans have the responsibility for implementing a PCP process while developing the habilitation plan.



[1] The coordination and service planning role is carried out by various entities within the service system. Providers in the fee-for-service environment use the term Service Coordinator to refer to the person who develops the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP).  The Fully Integrated Duals Advantaged-Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (FIDA-IDD) plan refers to this person as a Care Manager and/or Care Coordinator.  Future entities such as Care Coordination Organizations (CCOs) or Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) may use the term Care Managers. For the purposes of this document, references to Service Coordinators/Care Managers (SCs/CMs) is inclusive of all terms used to refer to the person who is responsible for the development of the individual’s Person-Centered Service Plans (PCSPs).

How is the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process achieved?

The PCP process is achieved with assistance from an individual’s circle of support, comprised of parties chosen by the individual to participate, as well as those upon whom decision-making authority is conferred on the individual by State law. An individual’s circle of support assists them in making service-related decisions, used to develop the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP). The circle of support may assist an individual by explaining the issues to be decided, answering questions, encouraging the individual’s active participation in decision-making and assisting the individual to communicate his or her preferences.

What are the requirements of a Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process?

In conjunction with the individual and his or her circle of support, the PCP process requires that supports and services are based on and satisfy the individual’s interests, preferences, strengths, capacities, and needs. They must be designed to empower the individual by fostering development of skills to achieve desired personal relationships, community participation, dignity, and respect. 

The PCP process should also incorporate the following:

a)Scheduling meetings with the individual at times and locations convenient for the individual;

b)Providing necessary information and support to ensure that the individual, to the maximum extent possible, directs the process and is enabled to make informed choices and decisions related to both service and support options and living setting options;

c)Being aware of cultural considerations, such as spiritual beliefs, religious preferences, ethnicity, heritage, personal values, and morals, to ensure that they are taken into account;

d)Communicating in plain language and in a manner that is accessible to and understood by the individual and parties chosen by the individual. This includes providing information and plans in a language understood by the individual, language interpretation during meetings if the individual has limited English proficiency, explaining a document orally or in a language other than English, or providing it in an alternative format such as pictures or Braille;

e)Providing a method for an individual to request updates to his or her plan, including who to notify and the means of notifying (phone or email) that person when a change is sought; and

f)Developing strategies to address conflicts or disagreements in the planning process, including clear conflict of interest guidelines for individuals, and communicating such strategies to the individual.

How does the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation relate to the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Rule and the timeline for implementation?

Understanding and implementing the PCP regulation is essential to meeting Federal HCBS Settings rules and regulations. The HCBS Settings requirements establish qualities and characteristics for all settings, where recipients of HCBS supports live and/or receive services, to ensure that the setting maximizes the person's autonomy, independence, integration and interaction with the broader community. The PCP process is essential for meeting the requirements for the HCBS Settings regulations. Without implementation of a true PCP process and related Person-Centered Service Plans (PCSP), the requirements of the HCBS Settings regulations cannot be met.  

The Federal Person-Centered Planning requirements became effective March 2014 as part of the HCBS Settings rules and regulations. In addition, New York State implemented the Person-Centered Planning regulation effective November 1, 2015.  To allow providers time to come into compliance, OPWDD’s Division of Quality Improvement (DQI) utilized a checklist during the October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016 survey cycle to assess regulatory compliance, and providers were issued any significant or notable findings and recommendations.  Beginning October 1, 2016 and going forward, DQI will be formally identifying non-compliance and issuing citations consistent with routine survey activity. 

All provider agencies must be in full compliance with HCBS Settings Rule by October 2018.  For further information on the HCBS Settings Rule and the timelines for meeting OPWDD quality standards, see OPWDD’s Administrative Directive Memorandum (ADM) #2014-14.  Additional information is also available on the OPWDD website via the HCBS Settings Toolkit: https://opwdd.ny.gov/opwdd_services_supports/HCBS/hcbs-settings-toolkit

Are there special requirements for individuals self-directing their services?

No. If an individual chooses to self-direct some or all of his or her services, the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process, as described above is followed and the plan must contain all of the same requirements of a Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) as described. The plan must contain all required attachments (or incorporate electronically) as prescribed in the Individualized Service Plan (ISP) instructions attached to OPWDD’s Administrative Directive Memorandum ADM, #2010-04 as well.

The individual’s self-direction budget, or the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the self-directed service, can be attached to the PCSP if the individual chooses.  The Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) should receive a copy of the self-direction budget or MOU so that it can be included in the individual’s service records as this is beneficial information to the PCP process.

Is the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) known by other terms?

Yes. All references to the PCSP, Individualized Service Plan (ISP), Life Plan or alternately named service plans, if applicable, including those used in a Managed Care Plan are the PCSP and inclusive of all appropriately attached/electronically incorporated habilitation plans. These plans must contain all required attachments as prescribed in the ISP Instructions attached to OPWDD’s Administrative Directive Memorandum (ADM) #2010-04, which includes all habilitation plans. It is also acceptable to have habilitation plans incorporated within an electronic system as an integral part of the PCSP.  

What are the requirements of a Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP)?

Utilizing the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process described above, the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) must, in conjunction with the individual receiving services, develop a PCSP. The PCSP must include and document the following: 

1)    the individual’s goals and desired outcomes;

2)    the individual's strengths and preferences;

3)    the individual’s clinical and support needs as identified through an OPWDD approved assessment (described in more detail in Assessments);

4)    the necessary and appropriate services and supports (paid and unpaid) that are based on the individual’s preferences and needs;

5)    any services that the individual elects to self-direct (described in more detail in Question 5);

6)    the providers of those services and supports;

7)    if an individual resides in a certified residential setting, that the residence was chosen by the individual after consideration of alternative residential settings (described in more detail in Roles and Responsibilities);

8)    the risk factors and measures in place to minimize risk, including individual specific staffing, back-up plans and strategies when needed (described in more detail in Roles and Responsibilities); and

9)    the individual and/or entity responsible for monitoring the plan.

Is the current Individualized Service Plan (ISP) template still acceptable for all forms of the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) (i.e. Life Plan)?

At this time, the current template can continue to be followed. Updated instructions and template may be provided at a future date to improve documentation related to implementing the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation. Any updates will not impact the billing standards outlined in OPWDD’s Administrative Directive Memorandum (ADM) #2010-03.  

Are there any additional considerations to be aware of related to the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation and the development of the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP)?

Yes.  The following should also be considered when developing a PCSP:

a)    Personal Relationships: OPWDD is committed to supporting individuals in the community and in the least restrictive settings possible that allow a desired quality of life and the achievement of outcomes most important to them. As services become more customized and individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD) are more actively establishing relationships and building routine connections with other community members, it is important to understand and support these relationships.

b)    Community Participation: Community participation for individuals with I/DD should include more than the supports and services a provider agency can offer. Successful community participation includes the engagement of both natural and community supports. This could include opportunities to interact with people they may or may not know while exploring educational endeavors, participating in civic and recreational activities or pursuing employment opportunities.

c)    Risk Factors and Safety: As part of the PCP process, strategies must be developed to address health and safety risks for the individual receiving supports. The goal of safeguard planning is not to eliminate all risk, but to find options that will assist individuals to manage the challenges and associated risks involved in their life choices, including community participation. A PCSP will enable an individual and his/her support team (including the Service Coordinator/Care Manager and provider agency staff) to identify potential risks and vulnerabilities (including behavioral and health considerations) and develop safeguards to help the person achieve outcomes or goals that they consider to be meaningful and purposeful. The safeguard planning process should not result in overprotection, preventing individuals from leading lives they consider to be significant and productive.  All safeguards must continue to be documented in the PCSP and, as appropriate, in all subsequent habilitation plans or Individual Protective Oversight Plan (IPOP).  The OPWDD has prepared a checklist to assist individuals, families, and providers to identify and discuss risks, informed choices, and safeguards. A copy of the Strengths and Risk Inventory can also be found on the OPWDD website at https://opwdd.ny.gov/node/5521.

What is the role of the assessment in the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process?

An assessment of functional and health-related needs, including individual strengths, assists the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) to develop a Person-Centered Service Plans (PCSP), ensuring that the services and supports are appropriate and necessary.

As part of the PCP process the SC/CM must use, when available, the results of the OPWDD approved assessment instrument, the Coordinated Assessment System (CAS).  Use of assessment information is necessary to assist in identifying needs and to help inform the development of the PCSP. Until systemic implementation of the CAS is complete, SCs/CMs may use the Developmental Disabilities Profile-2 (DDP-2).   In the instance when a DDP-2 and a CAS are both available for use in the PCP process, the CAS summary report must be reviewed and used to inform the development of a PCSP.

In addition to the OPWDD approved assessment, a broad range of assessment activities, including but not limited to, individual discovery, in-depth clinical assessments or focused independent living skill assessments are examples of additional assessment related activities to be used in the development of a PCSP.

Is the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) responsible for sharing the Coordinated Assessment System (CAS) summary report with individuals and incorporating this information into the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP)?

Yes. It is the responsibility of the SC/CM to obtain a copy of the results of the CAS via the available electronic system. For SCs, the electronic system is CHOICES. For CMs the electronic system may be CHOICES or the Uniform Assessment System-New York (UAS-NY). The results of the assessment must be provided and reviewed with the individual within one month of availability and documented in the SC’s/CM’s monthly note. Information from the assessment that is relevant to the development of the PCSP must be summarized and described in that plan, most typically included in the Profile and/or Safeguards Sections. To ensure the PCSP is up-to-date and supports and services are consistent with the needs and goals of the person, if there are emergent needs identified in the CAS summary, a PCSP addendum should be completed to support those newly identified needs within one month of availability.

What are the responsibilities of the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) in the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) planning process?

Once the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) is completed and signed, the SC/CM is responsible for implementing and monitoring the plan as outlined in the OPWDD’s ADM #2010-03 and ADM #2010-04. This requires that the SC/CM ensure that all required attachments (e.g. habilitation plans, Individualized Plan of Protective Oversight (IPOP), documentation to support rights modifications, nursing plans, etc.) are received by service providers.

The SC/CM must follow up with the individual, the circle of support or planning team, and habilitation providers to ensure that the plan is being properly implemented.

The SC/CM must review the PCSP with the individual at least twice each year.  Additionally, the service plan should be reviewed when:

   (a) The capabilities, capacities, or preferences of the individual have changed;

   (b) Requested by the individual and/or parties chosen by the individual;

   (c) A determination that the existing plan (or portions of the plan) is/are ineffective; and/or

   (d) Reassessment of the individual’s functional needs.

Are there any new responsibilities for Service Coordinators/Care Managers (SCs/CMs) identified in the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) Regulation?

  1. Below are the additional documentation requirements and responsibilities for SCs/CMs in the PCP regulation.

(a)       Alternative Residences:

If a person resides in a certified residential setting, the individual’s Person-Centered Service Plans (PCSP) must document alternative housing options considered, as well as that the individual has chosen his or her residence. 

The SC/CM is responsible for ensuring that the PCSP includes documentation that the individual is satisfied with his or her current living arrangement and, if not, that there is active planning to assist the individual to make a change. This information may be included in the SC’s/CM’s service notes, habilitation providers’ documentation or other related documentation. Documentation on the residential choices made should be comprehensive at the time that a person chooses a specific setting and should be an ongoing discussion at PCSP meetings to determine if the setting remains the active choice of the person.

(b)       Rights Modifications: 

The requirement to justify and document any modification of rights, as described in the PCP regulation, applies to any habilitation provider that delivers services in a certified location, such as site-based prevocational services, day habilitation, and residential habilitation. Justifications and documentation of rights modifications are part of HCBS Settings requirements and habilitation providers are expected to document how they will support people’s rights and document the need for any rights modifications. The expectations relative to the HCBS Settings rule are identified in OPWDD’s ADM #2014-04.

As stated in 14 NYCRR § 636-1.4(c), it is the responsibility of a SC/CM to ensure documentation of the following in the individual’s PCSP where there is a rights modification:

  1. a specific and individualized assessed need underlying the reason for the modification;
  2. the positive interventions and supports used prior to any modifications;
  3. less intrusive methods of meeting the need that were tried but did not work;
  4. a clear description of the condition that is directly proportionate to the specific assessed need;
  5. a regular collection and review of data to measure the ongoing effectiveness of the modification;
  6. established time limits for periodic review to determine if the modification is still necessary or can be terminated;
  7. an assurance that interventions and supports will cause no harm to the individual; and
  8. informed consent of the individual. 

If there is no documentation justifying a rights modification, the role of the SC/CM is to advocate for the individual’s rights to be restored or to have the habilitation provider put the supporting documentation in place. SCs/CMs should document their own activities as it relates to advocating for the individual’s rights.

A review of rights modifications should occur at all planning meetings and upon any change to the individual’s plan that has an impact on his or her rights.

(c)        The Notice of Person-Centered Rights: 

SCs/CMs must ensure that individuals and legally appointed decision-makers when applicable, are aware of the individual’s right to a PCSP formulated during a PCP process and are provided written notice of these rights. Individuals and their legal decision-makers must also be advised of their right to object. The OPWDD Person-Centered Planning Rights Notice may be found at:  Person Centered Planning Rights Notice.

For people new to Service Coordination (SC) or Care Management (CM), the notice of person-centered rights must be given prior to the initiation of the PCP process and development of the PCSP. For individuals who did not have a PCSP, such as an ISP, in place on November 1, 2015, the SC/CM must give written notice prior to the initiation of the PCP process and development of the service plan. This notice is only issued once. It is not a yearly requirement.

Service Coordination providers and Care Management administrative entities may draft their own notice or use the one that OPWDD has provided as a template. If a provider drafts its own notice, all elements within OPWDD’s template must be incorporated and the information must be conveyed in plain language and in a manner that is accessible to and understood by the parties.

(d)       Signatures of Providers on the PCSP:

The plan must be finalized and agreed to with the individual’s written informed consent and signed by the provider(s) responsible for implementing the PCSP.  

  1. Below are the additional documentation requirements and responsibilities for SCs/CMs in the PCP regulation.

(a)       Alternative Residences: 

If a person resides in a certified residential setting, the individual’s Person-Centered Service Plans (PCSP) must document alternative housing options considered, as well as that the individual has chosen his or her residence. 

The SC/CM is responsible for ensuring that the PCSP includes documentation that the individual is satisfied with his or her current living arrangement and, if not, that there is active planning to assist the individual to make a change. This information may be included in the SC’s/CM’s service notes, habilitation providers’ documentation or other related documentation. Documentation on the residential choices made should be comprehensive at the time that a person chooses a specific setting and should be an ongoing discussion at PCSP meetings to determine if the setting remains the active choice of the person.

(b)       Rights Modifications: 

The requirement to justify and document any modification of rights, as described in the PCP regulation, applies to any habilitation provider that delivers services in a certified location, such as site-based prevocational services, day habilitation, and residential habilitation. Justifications and documentation of rights modifications are part of HCBS Settings requirements and habilitation providers are expected to document how they will support people’s rights and document the need for any rights modifications. The expectations relative to the HCBS Settings rule are identified in OPWDD’s ADM #2014-04.

As stated in 14 NYCRR § 636-1.4(c), it is the responsibility of a SC/CM to ensure documentation of the following in the individual’s PCSP where there is a rights modification:

  1. a specific and individualized assessed need underlying the reason for the modification;
  2. the positive interventions and supports used prior to any modifications;
  3. less intrusive methods of meeting the need that were tried but did not work;
  4. a clear description of the condition that is directly proportionate to the specific assessed need;
  5. a regular collection and review of data to measure the ongoing effectiveness of the modification;
  6. established time limits for periodic review to determine if the modification is still necessary or can be terminated;
  7. an assurance that interventions and supports will cause no harm to the individual; and
  8. informed consent of the individual. 

If there is no documentation justifying a rights modification, the role of the SC/CM is to advocate for the individual’s rights to be restored or to have the habilitation provider put the supporting documentation in place. SCs/CMs should document their own activities as it relates to advocating for the individual’s rights.

A review of rights modifications should occur at all planning meetings and upon any change to the individual’s plan that has an impact on his or her rights.

(c)        The Notice of Person-Centered Rights: 

SCs/CMs must ensure that individuals and legally appointed decision-makers when applicable, are aware of the individual’s right to a PCSP formulated during a PCP process and are provided written notice of these rights. Individuals and their legal decision-makers must also be advised of their right to object. The OPWDD Person-Centered Planning Rights Notice may be found at:  https://opwdd.ny.gov/opwdd_services_supports/service_coordination/
medicaid_service_coordination/documents/Person_Centered_Planning_Rights_Notice
.

For people new to Service Coordination (SC) or Care Management (CM), the notice of person-centered rights must be given prior to the initiation of the PCP process and development of the PCSP. For individuals who did not have a PCSP, such as an ISP, in place on November 1, 2015, the SC/CM must give written notice prior to the initiation of the PCP process and development of the service plan. This notice is only issued once. It is not a yearly requirement.

Service Coordination providers and Care Management administrative entities may draft their own notice or use the one that OPWDD has provided as a template. If a provider drafts its own notice, all elements within OPWDD’s template must be incorporated and the information must be conveyed in plain language and in a manner that is accessible to and understood by the parties.

(d)       Signatures of Providers on the PCSP:

The plan must be finalized and agreed to with the individual’s written informed consent and signed by the provider(s) responsible for implementing the PCSP.  

Who has the responsibility for signing the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) once it is complete?

Once the PCSP is finalized, it must be agreed to with the individual’s written informed consent. The provider of Service Coordination/Care Management and the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) must be identified on PCSP as responsible for implementing and monitoring the plan. The SC/CM must sign the plan to confirm this understanding. 

Habilitation providers must sign the habilitation plans, as they are responsible for implementing the provisions of the plan. The habilitation plan is considered a component of the PCSP, so signing the habilitation plan attached to the PCSP fulfills the requirement.  For electronic PCSPs that incorporate the habilitation plans, the habilitation provider signs the PCSP as appropriate. Signatures reflecting the accountability of the habilitation provider to implement the plan are necessary for fulfilling the signature requirements. 

While it is best practice to have other OPWDD service providers sign the service plan as an indicator that they acknowledge their responsibility to implement the plan, the signature requirements as outlined here only apply, at this time, to service coordination and HCBS waiver providers with habilitation plans. 

It is the responsibility of the SC/CM to obtain the signatures of the individual as well as of the providers. As outlined in OPWDD’s ADM #2010-04, if the SC/CM does not receive signatures from an individual, in a timely manner, they may distribute the PCSP without the signature but must follow up with the individual to obtain the signature at a later date.  The SC/CM must then document why the individual did not sign in a timely manner.

What are the responsibilities of habilitation providers in the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process?

Habilitation providers are responsible for all requirements as outlined in OPWDD’s ADM #2012-01, as well as all requirements and standards outlined in the Administrative Directive Memorandums for the specific service being provided. 

Habilitation providers are responsible for working with the individual and his or her circle of support to:

a)    develop any needed habilitation plan(s),

b)    schedule meetings at times and locations that are convenient to the individual,

c)    sign the person-centered habilitation plan(s), and

d)    provide all necessary documents to the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) to ensure that the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) has all required attachments.

What is important for habilitation providers to understand regarding the changes to rights modifications in the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation?

Modifications to the rights identified for individuals receiving services in an OPWDD certified site must be supported by a specific assessed need and justified in the individual’s Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP). The expectations relative to the HCBS Settings rule are identified in OPWDD’s ADM #2014-04.

The rights potentially subject to modification include:

a)    Tenant rights: each individual must have a legally enforceable agreement that provides at a minimum the same responsibilities and protections from eviction that tenants have under the applicable landlord/tenant law.

b)    Right to privacy: each individual has a right to privacy in his/her sleeping or living unit.

c)    Right to freedom of movement and access to food: each individual has the freedom and support to control his/her own schedules and activities, and has access to food at any time.

d)    Right to visitors: each individual is able to have visitors of his/her choosing at any time. 

In the event that a rights modification affects another individual receiving services in the same setting who does not require a rights modification, the Service Coordinator/Care Manager (SC/CM) must ensure documentation of the following in that individual’s PCSP/habilitation plan:

a)    the impact that the rights modification has on the individual;

b)    the efforts taken to lessen the impact on the individual; and

c)    the informed consent of the individual.

What steps are taken if the person disagrees with the supports and services identified in the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP), including those identified in his or her habilitation plan?

Providers are responsible for identifying how conflicts of interest will be resolved. Conflicts of interest may include, but are not limited to, supervisory oversight of Service Coordinators/ Care Managers (SCs/CMs), financial interests in the provision of services, and personal or familial relationships of staff or SCs/CMs with members of the circle of support or individual. Agencies must develop policies that ensure conflicts of interest do not interfere with the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) process. 

Habilitation providers, Service Coordination providers and Care Management administrative entities also must develop strategies to address conflicts and disagreements in the PCP process and communicate them to the individual and his or her circle of support. Individuals and their circles of supports should be informed of the agency’s policies for resolving disagreements between individuals receiving services and circle of support members during the PCP process. 

In the event that a resolution for an identified disagreement/conflict cannot be achieved, the person receiving services can utilize the objection to services process as described in 14 NYCRR § 633.12.

Are there any changes to the billing standards or any new restrictions on billable service time due to the Person-Centered Planning (PCP) regulation?

No. The Person-Centered Planning regulation and this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) document do not supersede any of the payment standards in the OPWDD’s ADM #2010-03 (Medicaid Service Coordination (MSC) Documentation Requirements for Billing) and ADM #2012-01 (Habilitation Plan Requirements).

Are there any changes to records retention?

No. New York State regulations continue to require each Medicaid provider to prepare records to demonstrate its right to receive Medicaid payment for a service. These records must be “contemporaneous” and retained for a period of six years from the date the service was delivered or when the service was billed, whichever is later.

 

Who can be contacted if there are additional questions related to the OPWDD’s Person-Centered Planning (PCP) Regulation?

For answers to additional inquiries regarding OPWDD’s PCP Regulation please contact Shelly M. Okure, OPWDD Statewide Coordinator for Person-Centered Practices, at 518.476.1163 or [email protected] or contact Amanda Harper, Assistant Statewide Coordinator for Medicaid Service Coordination at 518.474.8254 or [email protected]gov.